Biomechanics & Biosystems

Research

How do proteins transport materials within a cell? How does the human ear automatically accommodate loud noises? How are biological accelerometers used to control balance?  How can robotic limbs and exoskeletons restore function?

The mechanics of materials, motion, and fluids are central to many aspects of biology and medicine. We work at the intersection of biology, medicine and engineering. We develop new devices and methodologies for a wide variety of biomedical and scientific applications across an enormous range of scales.

Specialties

  • Bio-imaging and neural networks
  • Biosensors
  • Mechanics of muscles, tendons, skin
  • Sports injury prevention
  • Robotic aids for human disabilities and rehabilitation
  • Cell mechanics and mechanotransduction
  • Cell adhesion and mechanics
  • Human-machine interfaces
  • Structural acoustics
  • Cochlear mechanics
  • Therapeutic ultrasound
  • Protein motors
  • Coiling of DNA
  • Dynamics of biological networks

Recent News

The American Society of Biomechanics recognizes Shorya Awtar for his outstanding work in translational biomechanics research, entrepreneurship, and societal benefit. 

Andre Boehman and Shorya Awtar have both received awards from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Luetkemeyer is one of 22 early-career scientists who make up the third cohort of Schmidt Science Fellows. The selection process for the 2020 Schmidt Science Fellows began with almost 400 nominated candidates from more than 80 world-leading science and engineering institutions. 

Rachel Vitali's dissertation on the advancing of inertial measurement unit technology acknowledged for ProQuest honorable mention.

Activity trackers, smart watches, glucose monitors, and other wearable biosensor technology are a growing part of our lives. Now, ME Research Associate Professor Mihaela Banu is putting her research where our mouths are, with a collaborative initiative to develop a new smart, cyber-physical dental implant system.

U-M ME, PhD student, Callan Luetkemeyer is a winner of the Savio L-Y. Woo Young Researcher Award – Biomechanical Research for ISLT-XVIII. She will be presenting her abstract at the symposium this February.