Biomechanics & Biosystems

Research

How do proteins transport materials within a cell? How does the human ear automatically accommodate loud noises? How are biological accelerometers used to control balance?  How can robotic limbs and exoskeletons restore function?

The mechanics of materials, motion, and fluids are central to many aspects of biology and medicine. We work at the intersection of biology, medicine and engineering. We develop new devices and methodologies for a wide variety of biomedical and scientific applications across an enormous range of scales.

Specialties

  • Bio-imaging and neural networks
  • Biosensors
  • Mechanics of muscles, tendons, skin
  • Sports injury prevention
  • Robotic aids for human disabilities and rehabilitation
  • Cell mechanics and mechanotransduction
  • Cell adhesion and mechanics
  • Human-machine interfaces
  • Structural acoustics
  • Cochlear mechanics
  • Therapeutic ultrasound
  • Protein motors
  • Coiling of DNA
  • Dynamics of biological networks

Recent News

Born in an engineering class, now the ‘arterial everter’ has been licensed to Baxter.

This award is conferred to the 3 best papers presented by student authors among 200 papers accepted from 800+ submitted abstracts.

What defines a living cell? How does one capture the molecular essence of life? These fundamental questions underpin the collaborative research program led by U-M ME Professor Allen Liu.

The prize is awarded to a mid-career researcher (10-25 years after earning the PhD or equivalent degree) in the field of engineering sciences who has had a substantial impact in his/her field.

Understanding the ways in which materials deform and develop stresses and how they respond to those stresses is relevant both to biological as well as nonliving systems, including lithium-ion batteries, other semiconducting devices and alloys used for structural applications, such as automobiles, aircraft and buildings.