Yoram Koren's work makes U-M bicentennial list of most important research advances

U-M has a distinguished history of research achievement spanning a broad range of disciplines. In celebration of U-M's bicentennial, the latest edition of Michigan Research contains a timeline highlighting some of the most important advances arising from the university's research enterprise over its first 200 years. In 1973, Yoram Koren, the James J. Duderstadt Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Manufacturing and Paul G. Goebel Professor Emeritus of Engineering, is featured for his work on Numerical Control and reconfigurable manufacturing:

Numerical Control

In 1973, University of Michigan Professor Yoram Koren invented the world's first computerized real-time adaptive controller for a milling machine, long before computers were commonly used in industrial applications.
Photo: U-M College of Engineering

In 1973, University of Michigan Professor Yoram Koren invented the world's first computerized real-time adaptive controller for a milling machine, long before computers were commonly used in industrial applications. Before his work in the 1970s, numerical control of machine tools was more of an art than a science. Koren also was credited with coining the term "Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems" (RMS), which he defined as a manufacturing system that has "exactly the production resources needed, exactly when needed."

Tags
Related professors