Mechatronics & Robotics

Research

Mechatronics integrates electronics, controls, and computers in the design of high performance systems. Most modern products - automobiles, household appliances, printers, hard-disk drives, surgical tools, to name a few - embody numerous 'intelligent' or 'smart' features enabled by mechatronics.

Mechatronic design strives to produce higher performance at lower costs, a critical goal in the tech sector in today's economy. Our mechatronic systems research focuses on:

  • Micro and nanopositioning systems
  • Haptic devices
  • Bio-inspired compliant systems

Specialties

  • Nanomanipulation and nano manufacturing
  • Robotics
  • Smart materials and structures
  • Structural health monitoring
  • Haptic interface and robotics
  • Production and application of nanostructured materials
  • Kinematics and synthesis of mechanisms
  • Human-robot interactions
  • Networked multi-agent systems

Recent News

Improving the functionality of robotic and manufacturing systems "comes down to understanding your system and identifying a strategy for improving performance," says ME Assistant Professor Kira Barton, whose laboratory combines fundamental and experimental modeling and controls research, from multi-agent coordination to additive manufacturing

FlexDex Surgical, an innovative medical device company founded by Mechanical Engineering Associate Professor Shorya Awtar and Medical School Professor James Geiger, has received coverage from several media outlets

ME's undergrad curriculum has a unique team-based, Design-Build-Test spine of required classes. In Design and Manufacturing I, II and III (ME250, 350 and 450 respectively), sophomores, juniors and seniors turn concepts into real, working engineered system

Perkins' work in micro-sensor technology could change the way you understand your golf swing, free throw or fly-fishing technique

FlexDex™ is a platform technology that provides enhanced dexterity, intuitive control, and natural force feedback in minimally invasive surgery.

A revolutionary shape-changing aircraft wing took to the air recently in a successful test flight. The equipment is developed by Ann Arbor-based FlexSys, Inc., founded and led by ME professor Sridhar Kota